From: Bink B on
..
League Player Averages

Year BA HR RBI SO
-----------------------------------------
2005 .268 19 81 109
2006 .275 20 85 113
2007 .270 18 84 117
2008 .267 18 82 118
2009 .266 20 83 121

These ARE the league averages for a pro player. A player with these
stats is an average player by definition.

Particular Player Stats

Year BA HR RBI SO
----------------------------------------
2005 .255 19 87 108
2006 .268 25 89 118
2007 .276 26 99 104
2008 .266 25 77 90
2009 .265 8 44 74 (played only 2/3 of a season)


Using poor, below average, average, above average or good´┐Ż how would you
describe this batter?

Thanks.
From: John Gregory on
On Mon, 21 Jun 2010, Bink B wrote:

> Using poor, below average, average, above average or good how would you
> describe this batter?

Safeco's kind of a pitcher's park, isn't it? You ought to take
that into account. I would describe him as a somewhat above
average hitting third baseman during his time with the team.
He had a really tough time in his first and last seasons, while
the middle seasons were pretty good.

They overpaid, based on what they thought was a breakout season
rather than the career year it actually was. Is that the answer
you're ultimately looking for, "not worth the money"? That's
pretty much conventional wisdom by now.

--
John Gregory ashbury at skypoint.com http://www.skypoint.com/ tilde ashbury
Thought for the moment:
Some days it is hard to remember which side of the Looking-Glass you are on.

From: Bink B on
John Gregory wrote:
> On Mon, 21 Jun 2010, Bink B wrote:
>
>> Using poor, below average, average, above average or good how would you
>> describe this batter?
>
> Safeco's kind of a pitcher's park, isn't it? You ought to take
> that into account. I would describe him as a somewhat above
> average hitting third baseman during his time with the team.
> He had a really tough time in his first and last seasons, while
> the middle seasons were pretty good.
>
> They overpaid, based on what they thought was a breakout season
> rather than the career year it actually was. Is that the answer
> you're ultimately looking for, "not worth the money"? That's
> pretty much conventional wisdom by now.

Good pickup. I asked because Vinny called his career remarkable and I
disagreed and was arguing with a friend.
From: John Gregory on
On Mon, 21 Jun 2010, Bink B wrote:

> Good pickup. I asked because Vinny called his career remarkable and I
> disagreed and was arguing with a friend.

Get new, and better, friends. :)

By the way, I didn't bother to argue about how you defined an
"average" player, but it could use further refinement. It
seems you (or whoever generated those numbers) took the league
total for things like HR and RBI, divided by 14 teams (OK),
and then divided by 9 batters in the lineup (not so OK). That
works only if you assume a player plays every inning of every
game. Only stars come even close to that. So a truly average
player, with fewer chances, will put up lower totals than those.

I think I read somewhere that a percentage close to 10 of all
plate appearances have been made by Hall of Famers. That kind
of puts a different perspective on how good an "average" player
really has to be. A league's total numbers are heavily skewed
by the cream of the crop; we don't notice that because of the
large number of mediocrities getting fewer than 300 PA.

--
John Gregory ashbury at skypoint.com http://www.skypoint.com/ tilde ashbury
Thought for the moment:
Anything I do is purely coincidental.

From: Bink B on
John Gregory wrote:
> On Mon, 21 Jun 2010, Bink B wrote:
>
>> Good pickup. I asked because Vinny called his career remarkable and I
>> disagreed and was arguing with a friend.
>
> Get new, and better, friends. :)
>
> By the way, I didn't bother to argue about how you defined an
> "average" player, but it could use further refinement. It
> seems you (or whoever generated those numbers) took the league
> total for things like HR and RBI, divided by 14 teams (OK),
> and then divided by 9 batters in the lineup (not so OK). That
> works only if you assume a player plays every inning of every
> game. Only stars come even close to that. So a truly average
> player, with fewer chances, will put up lower totals than those.

So wouldn't that push A.B.'s abilities the the next higher notch in HR
and RBIs? Or does that mean there are actually very few average players?
Or should I have said average starting player for a better fit?